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U.S. deaths spike over the holidays

Posted in Blog,Car Accidents on November 22, 2016

Georgia readers may want to be extra careful over the upcoming holiday season. Studies show that the U.S. mortality rate spikes over Thanksgiving and stays elevated for months afterward. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the U.S. death rate jumped about 5 percent between November and December 2013.

According to experts, some of the increased deaths can be attributed to traditional winter problems like cold weather and the flu. However, Thanksgiving is especially deadly due to car accidents and cardiac events, which are largely caused by human behavior.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Thanksgiving is consistently the deadliest holiday on U.S. roadways. On Thanksgiving day 2012, there were 764 fatal crashes, compared with 654 deadly collisions on Christmas that year. Research shows that around 40 percent of deadly Thanksgiving crashes involve drunk drivers while 60 percent involve passengers who were not wearing safety belts. As for cardiac events, studies have shown that there are up to 33 percent more coronary deaths during the winter than the summer. This may be attributed to increased consumption of unhealthy foods and alcohol during holiday meals.

Georgia residents injured in a car accident caused by a drunk driver or distracted driver may benefit by consulting with an attorney. Depending on the details of the case, legal counsel may recommend pursuing a personal injury lawsuit against the negligent driver who caused the crash. If the complaint is successful in court, an injured victim could be awarded compensation for their medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering and other related damages. Likewise, families who have lost a loved one in a fatal car accident may wish to pursue a wrongful death lawsuit against the at-fault driver and/or their insurance company.

Source: Forbes, “The U.S. Death Rate Spikes On Thanksgiving. Here’s Why,” Dan Diamond, Nov. 26, 2014