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How to Stay Safe During Night Walks

Night walks feel great. Walking once it gets dark because of short winter days, or to beat the heat of summer require strategies to be sure to stay safe. Short walks to the car, or long walks for exercise, all need the same precautions. Night Walking Safety Rules Differences between walking after dark and walking in daylight means changing habits to stay safe. Night walking should be on the sidewalk and pathways off the road, not on the street. In order to react quickly to vehicles, night walkers face into traffic to see clearly. Exercising extra caution when crossing streets… read more

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How Bad Is Buzzed Driving?

The term buzzed driving describes a driver exhibiting signs of impairment from alcohol or opiates while behind the wheel of a vehicle. Referring to impaired driving as buzzed driving tries to reduce the apparent severity of the crime. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that 2,597 people died in just the month of December (2010), with 775 deaths involving impaired drivers. Buzzed driving, impaired driving, or driving under the influence, all describe drivers who lack the necessary awareness to avoid accidents. The signs of alcohol or opiate impairment vary from person to person. How much alcohol, or drugs, it… read more

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How to Handle a Georgia Hit and Run Accident

Hit and run refers to a car accident that causes damage and a driver leaves the scene of the accident. That driver leaves without making a report of the incident to authorities or providing their contact information. It does not matter if the driver caused the accident. Everyone involved must remain at the scene until excused by law enforcement, or the direct exchange of information between drivers finishes up. Hit and run victims deal with shock, disbelief and confusion when someone leaves the scene of the accident. Even without injuries, a victim of a hit and run feels violated and… read more

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Can Prior Medical Records Be Used as Evidence in Georgia Accident?

Insurance companies work hard to minimize the payouts they make on personal injury claims. Once the victim proves they do suffer from a medical problem, the insurance company must find another way to reduce the claim. One of the ways they try to do this is by suggesting a pre-existing condition is the real cause of the accident victim’s current condition. Accident victims often feel like the insurance company does not believe them. The stress from this disbelief adds to their physical and emotional injuries from the accident. However, the insurance company is responsible only to their shareholders, so they… read more

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What Are Georgia’s Uninsured Motorist Laws?

Georgia does not require uninsured motorist insurance coverage. When a driver is not at fault in an accident with an uninsured vehicle, this insurance provides protection. Therefore, many Georgia drivers carry this additional coverage on their auto insurance policies. Most policies limit the coverage to $25,000 per person and a total of $50,000 for the entire accident. Uninsured Motorists and Underinsured Motorists Uninsured motorists (UM) carry no insurance, or the insurance provider denies coverage because of the circumstances of the accident. Underinsured motorists carry insurance, but the coverage is insufficient to cover the total cost of damages in the accident…. read more

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Is It Necessary to Report a Minor Car Accident?

Most car accidents are relatively minor. A fender bender resulting in no injuries and no major damage makes drivers wonder whether or not they should even report the accident. The answer simply depends on the situation. The accident’s severity and how well the parties communicate makes a big difference. After the exchange of insurance and contact information between drivers, they decide if they want to involve law enforcement. Law enforcement need not always become involved in a minor accident. State law requires filing accident reports only in certain circumstances, such as when the accident results in death, injury, or over… read more

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How Is Pain and Suffering Calculated?

Personal injury pain and suffering settlements vary greatly in Georgia, because no monetary cap exists on damages. Each state has its own rules establishing maximum damages for accident victims. The law in Georgia on pain and suffering (OCGA 9-10-184) states: “In the trial of a civil action for personal injuries, counsel shall be allowed to argue the worth or monetary value of pain and suffering to the jury; provided, however, that any such argument shall conform to the evidence or reasonable deductions from the evidence in the case.” This statute covers a broad range. It allows juries to determine damages… read more

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What It Means When a Hospital Files a Lien in Your Injury Case

The claimant in a personal injury first seeks medical treatment. Let us assume they do not have health insurance. Next thing he or she knows, a notice of intent to file a hospital lien arrives in the mailbox. This letter has a local attorney’s signature. The return address reads as a big law office or a huge collections company. Most People Find This Stressful, Especially on Top of Their Recent Injury This is standard procedure for most every hospital in Georgia. The medical facility knows that without health insurance the chances of collecting from the patient are slim. This way… read more

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What Is Georgia’s Move Over Law?

Many states, including Georgia, have enacted some type of Move Over Law in an effort to protect workers and emergency personnel who respond to jobs on the side of the road. Every year, people lose their lives in roadside collisions. In 2017, nearly 800 people lost their lives in work zone accidents. This number does not include roadside accidents that happened outside of work zones, such as police stops. Failing to obey Georgia’s Move Over Law could lead to fines, or more serious penalties if the driver causes an accident. The Details of the Law in Georgia Georgia’s Move Over… read more

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Safety Tips for Driving in Heavy Rain

It is not always possible to avoid driving in bad weather, such as fog, snow, or heavy rain. Rainstorms in Georgia are especially common in the springtime, with daily showers that can catch drivers unaware. Learning how to operate your vehicle safely in a heavy rainstorm is critical if you wish to avoid car accidents while driving in Georgia. Check Your Equipment Before Driving Before you start a car trip, prepare for a potential storm by checking your vehicle’s windshield wipers and washer fluid. Your wipers should not show signs of wear and tear, such as cracked rubber. They should… read more

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